And falling to the ground he heard a voice saying to him, ‘Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me?’ And he said, ‘Who are you, Lord?’ And he said, ‘I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting. The Conversion on the Way to Damascus (Conversione di San Paolo) illustrates the scene - described in Acts of the Apostles (9:3–9) - when the pharisee Saul - a known persecutor of Christians who had participated in the stoning of Saint Stephen - was converted into a Christian after Christ appeared and spoke to him on the road to Damascus. The first versions of both pieces were rejected, so Caravaggio was forced to repaint them. I hope you may be able to assist me or direct me in the right direction. Wren, Saint Paul's Cathedral William Hogarth A Rake's Progress Marriage a-la-Mode Thomas Gainsborough, Mr. and Mrs. Andrews Joseph Wright of Derby, A Philosopher Giving a Lecture at the Orrery Sir Joshua Reynolds, Lady Cockburn and Her Three Eldest Sons. That one is in the Cerasi Chapel of the Church of Santa Maria del Popolo. The Conversion of Saint Paul (or Conversion of Saul), by the Italian painter Caravaggio, is housed in the Odescalchi Balbi Collection of Rome. Caravaggio visits the theme of St. Paul’s conversion on the way to Damascus at least twice. Caravaggio treated both themes with extreme austerity and simplicity. The Conversion of Saint Paul is the second of Caravaggio’s paintings to depict the moment of Saint Paul’s revelation. // -->. ( Log Out /  google_ad_client = "ca-pub-1407145561561584"; The Conversion of Saint Paul, 1600 by Caravaggio. T: +27 21 6574800 The prayer was written for the 2008 Jubilee Year of St. Paul the Apostle. It is one of at least two paintings by Caravaggio of the same subject. ( Log Out /  In Caravaggio: The Contarelli Chapel and other church commissions. The one most people are familiar with is the one that’s dominated almost entirely by the stricken saint’s horse. He wrote that the first pair was rejected because the donor, Monsignor Cerasi, did not like them (therefore they must have been completed before Cerasi's death … Post was not sent - check your email addresses! painting by Caravaggio (Museum: Erba-Odescalchi). http://www.uhurucom.co.za, this painting is “conversation on the way to damascus”. This painting in very different from other paintings of religious scenes. Log in to USEUM to download unlimited free images, send e-cards and interact with thousands … Kind Regards, Would there be enough recent fingerpri…, “It seems that Christians read and understand their Bibles less today” by Sinclair Ferguson, "God plus the world is not more sufficient, more glorious, or more blessed than God minus the world." It was done in the year 1600 and although I can’t find anything that says exactly where it was painted, my guess is it was painted in France. Oil on canvas. Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, (1571 – 1610). ( Log Out /  Would you possibly have a hi-res image of “The Conversion of Saint Paul” by Caravaggio for a possible cover of Southern Anglican magazine (it’s a religious publication, we based in Cape Town, South Africa). The old hostler in the background seems not to notice, as his is preoccupied with the horse, and not focused on Paul. —…, “Though Jesus Christ be the King of kings, and Lord of lords, and rules over all, He is so condescending and compas…. Another is The Conversion of Saint Paul on the Road to Damascus, in the Cerasi Chapel of Santa Maria del Popolo. On our pages you will find over 10,000 works of art. Picture Co-ordinator Another is The Conversion of Saint Paul on the Road to Damascus, in the Cerasi Chapel of Santa Maria del Popolo. Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. He placed Paul on his back in a pool of light, just after having been struck from his horse by a divine thunderbolt. The Conversion of Saint Paul b y Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1600-1601) Oil on canvas. The Conversion of Saint Paul (or Conversion of Saul ), by the Italian painter Caravaggio, is housed in the Odescalchi Balbi Collection of Rome. Caravaggio depicted Saint Paul at the moment of his conversion, lying on his back with his hands thrown up in the air and his eyes closed.