Vasari schreibt über Raffaels Porträt in seinen Vite: Raffaels Julius-Porträt gilt als Schlüsselwerk für das repräsentative Papstporträt der folgenden Jahrhunderte. During the cleaning process, the plain dark background was removed leaving the green textile and this is what can now be seen. [27] It matches a catalogue of paintings in the Palazzo Borghese in Rome in 1693. Portrait of Pope Julius II is an oil painting attributed to Italian painter Raphael. Presseinformation. Giorgio Vasari, writing long after Julius' death, said that "it was so lifelike and true it frightened everyone who saw it, as if it were the living man himself".[1]. "The Altered Background of Raphael's 'Portrait of Pope Julius II' in the National Gallery", "Portrait of Julius II – a Raphael case study", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Portrait_of_Pope_Julius_II&oldid=987451982, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 7 November 2020, at 03:50. 1823 erschien ein Julius-Porträt Raffaels im Inventar der Sammlung des britischen Bankiers John Julius Angerstein (1732–1823), das nach dessen Tod erstellt wurde, heute überwiegend als Original erkannte Version der National Gallery in London. The positioning and lighting within the paintings seems to indicate that they were meant to each flank an altar in the domed chapel. The positioning and lighting within the paintings seems to indicate that they were meant to each flank an altar in the domed chapel. The painting exists in many versions and copies, and for many years, a version of the painting which now hangs in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence was believed to be the original or prime version, but in 1970 opinion shifted. The paintings were still recorded as part of the Borghese collection in 1693, as a small inventory number 118 at the bottom left of the London Julius shows. Raffaels Julius-Porträt gilt als Schlüsselwerk für das repräsentative Papstporträt der folgenden Jahrhunderte. von Frankreich und Kaiser Maximilian als Akteure beteiligt waren. [3] The painting "established a type for papal portraits that endured for about two centuries. [9], According to the 1901 catalogue of the National Gallery, "This portrait was repeated several times by Raphael, or his scholars. The painting presumably left the collection between 1794 and 1797, and its whereabouts are then unknown until it reappears in the Angerstein Collection in London by 1823, and so was acquired by the National Gallery in 1824, initially catalogued as a Raphael, but this attribution was soon abandoned for over a century. Portrayed in three-quarters profile to the right, seated in an armchair, the pope is wearing a mozzetta over his cassock and he has a velvet cap. Das Bildnis Papst Julius’ II. Jahrhunderts schrieben in ihren Reiseberichten, dass sie das Bild dort gesehen hätten. Introduction. The results of this research was published by Cecil Gould of the National Gallery in 1970. Vorbesitzer war der Marchese Vincenzo Giustinian, aus dessen Sammlung 160 Bilder 1815 an König Friedrich Wilhelm III. [28] It matches a catalogue of paintings in the Palazzo Borghese in Rome in 1693. im Städel, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Das Julius-Porträt, https://de.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Bildnis_Papst_Julius_II.&oldid=202792585, „Creative Commons Attribution/Share Alike“. [12] In 1969 Konrad Oberhuber of the National Gallery of Art in Washington asked the National Gallery to take x-ray photographs of their version. The initial is as of now accepted to be the version found in the National Exhibition, London. in Öl ähnlich und lebendig, dass es dem Beschauer die gleiche Ehrfurcht einflößte, die er beim Anblick des Papstes selbst empfunden hätte.“[2]. Vasari schreibt über Raffaels Porträt in seinen Vite: „Damals malte er das Porträt von Julius II. In spite of the fact that the depictions were paired for a time, through change of ownership the “Madonna of Loreto” is presently located in the Musée Condé, Chantilly. Portrait of Pope Julius II is an oil painting of 1511–12 by the Italian High Renaissance painter Raphael. Along with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, he shapes the conventional trinity of incredible masters of that period. Raphael overpainted this with the green cloth. Commissioned by Julius II, Raphael's oil painting would become one of inspiration and admiration - influencing the future of papal portraiture. The portrait of Pope Julius II was unusual for its time and would carry a long influence on papal portraiture. [19], An impressive array of Renaissance artists were brought in to decorate Santa Maria del Popolo, beginning with Raphael. Die National Gallery zeigt das Bild in Raum 8 ihrer ständigen Ausstellung. From early in its life, it was specially hung at the pillars of the church of Santa Maria del Popolo, on the main route from the north into Rome, on feast and high holy days. This is a copy after the celebrated portrait by Raphael now in the National Gallery in London. It has 101 x 83 cm dimensions and you can find the art work in Room IX of the Borghese Gallery. For over two centuries the prime version of the painting remained together with the Madonna of Loreto, first at Santa Maria del Popolo until 1591, then in private collections; then for a time in the early 19th century its location was unknown. [9] 2011 erwarb das Städel das Bild zu einer bisher nicht genannten Summe. The provenances of the various versions of this painting are constructed based on documents, analysis of the paintings and preliminary sketches. Politisch war es eine Zeit kriegerischer Auseinandersetzungen um die Vorherrschaft in Italien, bei denen der Kirchenstaat, die Republik Venedig, Ludwig XII. "[10] There is a possible cartoon for the London version in Palazzo Corsini, Florence,[3] and a red chalk drawing at Chatsworth House.[11]. Della Rovere (literally translates to 'of the oak tree'), were believed to have their heraldic oak tree painted in the original portrait of Pope Julius II which was since overpainted several times. Generally there would be portraits … This proof was overall generally accepted. The eyes of the works of art were unhappy and gave a contemplative feeling. [20] Both paintings by Raphael, Julius II and the Madonna were hung on pillars during feast days[21][22] or high holy days.

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