Saul, breathing murderous threats, full of self-importance thanks to his powerful backers in Jerusalem, is on his way to Damascus to carry on his violent campaign against the Christians (Acts 9). In 1606, after killing a young man during one of his notorious fights, the Pope issued a death warrant against him and Caravaggio fled Rome. The one most people are familiar with is the one that’s dominated almost entirely by the stricken saint’s horse. Caravaggio was a fast worker, but was also arrested repeatedly for his rough behaviour. His technique was as spontaneous as his temper. There is implied violence in this scene and yet, we are being told, no one will be hurt. The other one, which is really called The Conversion of Saint Paul, is now part of the Odescalchi Balbi Collection in Rome. He chose not to face justice but to leave Rome. As stated in a published notice in 1604, describing his previous years: “after a fortnight's work he [Caravaggio] will swagger about for a month or two with a sword at his side and a servant following him, from one ball-court to the next, ever ready to engage in a fight or an argument, so that it is most awkward to get along with him.” - wikipedia. Michelangelo Caravaggio received a commission to create two paintings for the Cerasi Chapel in Santa Maria del Popolo; one was titled ‘The Conversion of St Paul’. But Jesus meets him on the road, blinds him and knocks him to the ground. The Conversion of Saint Paul (or Conversion of Saul), by the Italian painter Caravaggio, is housed in the Odescalchi Balbi Collection of Rome.It is one of at least two paintings by Caravaggio of the same subject, the Conversion of Paul.Another is The Conversion of Saint Paul on the Road to Damascus, in the Cerasi Chapel of Santa Maria del Popolo. His technique was as spontaneous as his temper. The old hostler in the background seems not to notice, as his is preoccupied with the horse, and not focused on Paul. Caravaggio depicted Saint Paul at the moment of his conversion, lying on his back with his hands thrown up in the air and his eyes closed. The Footprints of Jesus . Upon moving to Rome, where many new palazzos and churches were being constructed, numerous art works were required for walls and alters, and commissions for paintings such as ‘The Conversion of St Paul’ were coveted opportunities for artists to boost their livelihood. The moment when his life and with it the work of the gospel and the shape of human society across the whole world will change. The Conversion of Saint Paul (or Conversion of Saul ), by the Italian painter Caravaggio, is housed in the Odescalchi Balbi Collection of Rome. Caravaggio was a fast worker, but was also arrested repeatedly for his rough behaviour. His face is in shadow as he is excluded from the drama that has overtaken Saul. His naturalistic approach and stylistic tenebrism became a novelty; he would be engaged for the rest of his life. How are the mighty fallen! On numerous occasions he spent time in jail and vandalized his own dwelling. He has dropped his sword and is groping upwards blindly, hands open, defenceless. Caravaggio became instantly successful. Saul, breathing murderous threats, full of self-importance thanks to his powerful backers in. He chose not to face justice but to leave, . The horse is there to emphasise the fall: the rider has lost his seat. But Jesus meets him on the road, blinds him and knocks him to the ground. The Conversion of Saint Paul, 1600 by Caravaggio. The Conversion of St Paul Michelangelo Caravaggio received a commission to create two paintings for the Cerasi Chapel in Santa Maria del Popolo; one was titled ‘The Conversion of St Paul’. to carry on his violent campaign against the Christians (Acts 9). Like Michelangelo Caravaggio uses the metaphor of light from heaven to indicate the private communication that is going on. However, the artist did not handle his success well. God deals with us sometimes in shocking, sudden, even brutal ways. Indeed, if you draw in the diagonals of the painting, it is the hoof that is the centre of the painting. His work became popular for the tenebrism technique he used, which used shadow to emphasize lighter areas. Like a piece of theatre he grabs our attention by filling the stage with a few huge, highly realistic figures, arrestingly arranged and, in Saul’s case, dramatically foreshortened, using light to direct our attention. An angel supports Christ as he beckons to Paul, who has fallen to the ground, appearing to be blinded by the bright light and stunned by the holy voice. Created between 1600 and 1601, this conversion, like the Cerasi Chapel painting, uses Caravaggio’s trademark … Another is The Conversion of Saint Paul on the Road to Damascus, in the Cerasi Chapel of Santa Maria del Popolo. So the servant blends in behind the horse as a bystander. He went to Naples and from there to the island of Malta, where his temper got him into trouble again. In fact, Caravaggio emphasises Saul’s helplessness. The piece clearly encompasses the artist’s personal stylistic aspects such as the exceptional realism of the angel’s face. According to Acts 9 those with Saul heard a noise, but had no understanding of what was happening to him. How are the mighty fallen! But just as St Paul’s conversion was the defining moment of his life, one could argue that these two works mark a similar point in Caravaggio’s development as an artist. The horse’s eye is clearly on the prostrate figure. Above Saul the elderly servant is taking charge of the horse. To me what is most striking about the horse is how careful it is not to harm Saul. He wrote that the first pair was rejected because the donor, Monsignor Cerasi, did not like them (therefore they must have … At age 21 he moved to Rome, where he received his first public commissions which were so compelling and so innovative that he became a celebrity almost overnight. Caravaggio (1571-1610) was born in Caravaggio, Italy, as Michelangelo Merisi. This painting in very different from other paintings of religious scenes. Caravaggio Narcissus at the Source Calling of St. Matthew The Conversion of St. Paul (or The Conversion of Saul) Crucifixion of St. Peter The Supper at Emmaus Deposition (or Entombment) Death of the Virgin Caravaggio and Caravaggisti in 17th-century Europe Guido Reni, Aurora Artemisia Gentileschi, Judith Slaying Holofernes 15 Facts about the Apostle Paul & Brief About His Conversion – I share with you 10 facts about the Apostle Paul from the Bible, a well-known name in the New Testament. He is huge, filling two thirds of the canvas. , is not focused on the theme of pride and humiliation, but on the spiritual reality of what is happening to Saul: the direct confrontation between Saul and the risen Jesus. And that, of course, could have been the dramatic theme for Caravaggio.

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